Omni December 1990

 

 

SPECIAL UFO EDITION

THE SEARCH FOR
EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE:
HOW MUCH DO SCIENTISTS
(AND THE GOVERNMENT) REALLY KNOW?

PLUS:
OMNI'S ALIEN ALMANAC
HUMAN - E.T. HYBRIDS
SECRETS OF THE ABDUCTEES
AN INSIDE LOOK AT A FLYING SAUCER


THE MYSTERIOUS CORNFIELDS
OF ENGLAND

AND THE SOVIET SPACE EXPERIENCE

 
OMNI1990DecLG

Vol.13 No. 3

Cover Art: The only thing that was mentioned about the front cover graphic was on the inside of the table of contents a (copyright) Sega."


Editor in Chief & Design Director: Bob Guccione

President: Kathy Keeton
Graphics Director: Frank Devino
Managing Editor: Steve Fox
Art Director: Dwayne Flinchum

 
Contents / Articles

First Word (pg 8)
The success of nations depends on people's fluency in science
by Dr.Samuel Broder

Omnibus (pg 10)
Contributing authors

Communications (pg 12)
Readers' writes.

Stars (pg 16)
If extraterrestrial intelligence does exist,
why haven't we observed any evidence
by Thomas R. McDonough

Law (pg 17)
Electronic Frontier Foundation:
Defending hackers against crimefighters
by Bill Lawren

Mind (pg 18)
The cough suprressant you bough
might also combat your memory loss
by Jeff Goldberg

Body (pg 20)
A painkiller developed ten years ago could be
a real antidote to drug addiction.
by John Robert Marlow

Earth (pg 22)
Lightning technology in the future will use
holograms to provide natural light
by Dana Points

Space (pg 26)
The cosmonauts experience with the Soviet space station is
providing NASA with invaluable information to avoid
making similar mistakes.
by James Oberg

Arts (pg 28)
Little Green Men: Is the country really ready for
their mind-altering space jazz music?
by Richard Broderick

Artificial Intelligence (pg 30)
Self-improving computers: Algorithms can help software
evolve to meet new and growing demands.
by Steve Ditlea

Continuum (pg 33)
The importance of whale watching, plus mood foods, space trash
collectors, naming planets, microwavable eyesights, and 3-D TV

The Big Ear (pg 42)
The search for extraterrestrial intelligence: The coming generation.
The first messages from space will probably arrive in the form of
radio waves. Will astronomers in Arecibo, Puerto Rico, be the
first to make contact?
by Dennis Pverbye

Fiction: Snapshots From the Butterfly Plague (pg 50)
You survived Alfred Hitchcock's birds.
How will you fare against this new winged threat?
by Michael Bishop

Pictorial: Field of Dreams? (pg 60)
Are the mysterious circles on British farmlands proof of UFOs?
Scientists say they know the truth.
by Dava Sobel

Freedom Trail (pg 68)
Traveling through a Eastern Europe, a documentary filmmaker
reports on what the future holds for the people of the former
Communist bloc countries.
by Rob Fruchtman

Interview (pg 74)
Frouk el-Baz usually explores upward into outer space. Now he's
reaching into Egypt's pyramids and other archaeological sites and
divining the future of the planet based on its past.
by Thomas Bass

Fiction: The Dead Love You (pg 82)
After car owner Anthea Powell is involved in a mysterious auto
collision, she quickly discovers that even maximum insurance
coverage will not guarantee full protection from a vengeful motorist -
but she has effective ways of protecting herself.
by Jonathan Carroll

What the Government Isn't Saying About UFO's (pg 90)
The cosmic Watergate: What's known and what's covered up.
Is the federal government embarrassed by its own UFO investigations?
by Patrick Huyghe

The Alien Almanac (pg 97)
A guide to UFO's: Inside a flying saucer abductee confessions,
plus: Are you a human-alien hybrid?

Books (pg 112)
The Leningrad Bible: High-resolution images of the world's oldest
known Hebrew text will provide new facts about the writing -
and editing of the Bible.
by Linda Marsa

Phenomenon (pg 118)
The creation of one man, this universe may
exist only in his computer.
by Bob Berger

The Omni Arcade (pg 139)
The latest computer and video games.
Pickles that glow in the dark.
by Bob Lindstrom and Scot Morris

Star Tech (pg 146)
Techno-tools of tomorrow

Last Word (pg 148)
Questionable answers to age-old quandaries.
by Mery Morris