Omni January 1991

 

 

SPECIAL SECTION:ELECTRONIC GAMES

VIRTURAL REALITY: LIFE IN A COMPUTER

BUSINESS 2001: MANAGING THE 21ST CENTURY

DALAI LAMA: NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTIONS

CAN ANIMALS THINK?

STARSHIPS MADE OF ICE

REGENERATE YOUR OWN ORGANS

 
OMNI1991JanLG

Vol.13 No. 4

Cover Art: While futurists predict the way in which we'll live in the twenty-first century, artist Stanislaw Fernandes strives to unite modern-day techniques of painting and cutting-edge avant-garde perception. His work Head Series 1990 melds evocative symbolic imagery with geometric shapes, cool, muted colors and thought-provoking subject matter..
 
Contents / Articles

First Word
New technologies and novel ways of thinking will alter life for baby boomers
So what does that mean for 81 million Americans who begin retiring in the
twenty-first century?
by Marvin Cetron


Omnibus
The Who's Who of contributing authors

Communications
Readers writes

Forum
Knowledge is the first tool of the future, and as we enter the
last decade of this century, our mission is clear.
by Keith Ferrell

Explorations
Cyberthon was a 24-hour virtual reality marathon,
but was it all worthwhile? A science-fiction author reports on
the state of the technology.
by Gregg Keizer

Animals
Unlike humans, animals always express their feelings.
The better that we understand them, the more we'll enjoy their company
by Michael W. Fox

Space
Galactic igloos: Clusters of hydrogen ice could be the ideal fuel -
and alternative construction material for spacecraft of the
twenty-first century.
by Steve Ditlea

Stars
Chunks of virgin rock as old as the sun bear remembrances of
stars whose glory faded long before the birth of our solar system
by Gergory T. Pope

The Great Omni Treasure Hunt Announcement
Find out how you could easily reap rich rewards.

Continuum
Consumers and their mind boggling machines:
deja vu and the slow brain;
earthquakes and the battle of Jericho;
tobacco food supplements;
and fickle French fungi.

Challenge and Responce
What corporations will have the upper hand in the twenty-first century?
John Diebold of The Diebold Group, IBM's Michael J Quinlan, and other
business leaders address future exectutives on new technologies,
changing demographics and human needs.
by Pamela Weintraub

Internal Medicine
The organiods are coming!
Neo-organ technology will replace organ transplants.
And medicine will take a giant leap when our bodies are capable
of total regeneration.
by Sherry Baker

Interview
The whiz kid behind virtual reality, Jaron Lanier
is the unquestioned guru of the new cult.
by Douglas Stewart

Pictoral: Live Illusions
Meet Ray Tracy, Hollywood's newest star.
But he exists only in the computer. The technology that makes the
graphic performer possible will affect everything from videos and
movies to political campaign messages.
by Robert Killheffer

Fiction: The Sons of Noah
The faithful live peacefully in a hidden Oregon valley until
the simple harmony of their religious community is suddenly
disrupted by a greedy developer's ambitious scheme.
by Jack Cady

Dalai Lama: His Resolutions
The Tibetan holy man's perspectives on science and technology
are more at home in the twenty-first century than you'd expect
from this simple monk.
by Keith Haray

Antimatter
DNA art in space;
mystery bomber in the Everglades;
Bigfoot in China;
moon babies in Lake Michigan

Special Section: The worlds of Electronic Games
Computer and video games aren't just for kids. Game playing
has evolved from boards to computers, from rolling dice to role playing.
Now you can travel to real or fantastic universes, make learning fun,
and enhance your game playing systems with all the latest accessories

Arts
You can't just stand there and look at Myron Kruger's creations.
His artificial realities turn art into an interactive game.
by Karen Wright

Phenomenon
Slicon palette: A computer artist weaves complex mathematical
formulas into works of fine art.
by Jane Bosveld

Last World
Rock 'n' roll musicians and computer games: The possiblities are baffling.
by Robert Bixby