Omni February 1991

 

 

$40,000 PLUS! TREASURE HUNT INSIDE

BIOCHEMICAL WAR: THE NEW SHAPE OF DEATH

ARTHUR MILLER: EYE OF THE BEHOLDER

SQUEEZING ENERGY FROM A VACUUM

PLUS:
FICTION BY J.G. BALLARD,
MAPPING BRAIN TRAFFIC,
CHIMPANZEE DOCTORS,
COMPUTER SEX,
AND MUCH, MUCH MORE

 
OMNI1991FebLG

Vol.13 No. 5

Cover Art: In the world of limitless, nonpolluting energy, there will be time to reflect on beauty.
Artist Mel Odom captures that quality of peaceful reflection in this month's cover, The Perfumed Garden. The work combines pencils, dyes, and gouache to create a tranquil unity, a vision of a future toward whose restfulness we can aspire.


Editor in Chief & Design Director: Bob Guccione

President: Kathy Keeton
Editor: Keith Ferrell
Graphics Director: Frank Devino
Managing Editor: Phil Scott
Art Director: Dwayne Flinchum

 
Contents / Articles

First Word (pg 10)
Is beauty in the eye of the beholder - or only in the minds
of lawmakers and fundamentals who judge art on the basis of
content and not quality? A Pulitzer prize-winner puts the
future of free expression in perspective.
by Arthur Miller

Forum (pg 14)
Science can be glorious entertainment if we give our
children's teachers the freedom to be creative.
by Keith Ferrell

Omnibus (pg 16)
The Who's Who of contributing authors

Communications (pg 17)
Readers' writes

The 1991 Great Treasure Hunt (pg 18)
Will you make a withdrawal from our cache machine?

Mind (pg 24)
Mapping the electronic traffic in the brain demonstrates
how far AI must evolve before it can replicate brain functions.
by Gregory T. Pope

Space (pg 25)
The Soviets claim their shuttle ejection system will save
lives. The problem: Convincing the rest of the world
by James Oberg

Body (pg 28)
Giving the limbless a new Sense-of-Feel in their prosthetic
feet will also aid paraplegics, diabetics, and others.
by Mary Glucksman

Animals (pg 30)
When they're not feeling up to par, chimps raid nature's
medicine cabinet. Now they're sharing their secrets with us.
by Beth Howard

Continuum (pg 33)
The future of education in Czechoslovakia; zero-gravity
dentisty; the southpaw revolution; intelligent clothes; safe
sex of the simulated kind; armpits for the sake of
science and more.

A Poison In Every Caldron (pg 42)
Dangerous toxins: With nations continuing to develop
biological and chemical weapons, here's our assessment
of the arsenal and how it will shape the future of
war and peace. Plus: A global guide to who has
cheimcal weapons.
by W.E. Gutman

Volatile Vacuum (pg 50)
Imagine: Unlimted, free energy fueling our cities and homes;
computers more powerful than the human brain;
cardboard-thin televisions. Zero-point energy could turn
physics on its head.
by Owen Davies

Fiction: Dream Cargoes (pg 58)
After the world abandons the Prospero, the ship runs agound
off a garbage island where its toxic contents have a
strange and wonderous effect on the ecology.
by J.G. Ballard

Pictorial: The Mathematical Gardener (pg 65)
The formulas used in the creation of these graphic flowers
could be the basis of the mathematical rules that govern
the development of plant life around the world.
by Sandy Fritz

Interview (pg 74)
In the mid-Seventies, Burce Ames initiated the hunt for
man-made carcinogens. Today he advocates eating produce
sprayed with pesticides. Plus, opinions from several
of his leading detractors.
by Bill Moseley

Fiction: Peter (pg 82)
Now all grown up, Wendy and the boys wait for their
leader, who promised to return every spring.
by Pat Murphy

Antimatter (pg 89)
Child abuse, near-death experiences, and alien abductions:
Is there a link? Budd Hopkins versus mental health
professionals; skeptics and their horoscopes;
reptilian publicy.

Star Tech (pg 114)
Techno-tools of tomorrow

Video Games (pg 118)
The best games of the year
by Bob Lindstrom

Games (pg 120)
Try these cockeyed concoctions, then create your own
mixed-up drinks in Competition #52
by Scot Morris

Last Word (pg 122)
Humor: This gutter guru will divine the future by
reading your car's oil spills.
by Helen McKenna