Omni December 1991

 

 

STAR TREK VI:
AN EXCLUSIVE LOOK AT THE FILM,
THE FAMILY, AND THE FUTURE OF STARSHIP ENTERPRISE BY DIRECTOR NICHOLAS MEYER

CLASS ACTS:
SCHOOLS THAT INVENT THE FUTURE

THE NEW CARTOGRAPHERS:
IMAGING A WORLD THAT HASN'T HAPPEND YET

SAGDEEV:
TO MARS WITH THE SOVIETS AND
OTHER TECHNOROMANTIC REVELATIONS

 
OMNI1991DecLG

Vol.14 No. 3

Cover Art: The image is as familiar as Warhol's soup cans, Mickey's ears or the Coca-Cola logo: the massive starship Enterprise standing ready for battle, as countless stars light up the darkness of deep space. Now twenty-five years old, the Star Trek story continues to fascinate and entertain us, indeed to illuminate us.

 
Contents / Articles

First Word
Looking for locations for the new film At Play in the Fields of the Lord,
the Brazilian cinematographer saw his homeland in a new light.
by Lauro Escorel

Omnibus
The Who's Who of contributing authors

Communications
Readers' Writes

Earth
Scientists intently study the newest place on Earth
to discover how life evolved when the planet was young.
by Jeanne K. Hanson

Political Science
Why doesn't the U.S. buy the nukes the Soviets are
tossing out to keep up with the Bushes?
by Tom Dworetzky

Tools
Everything you always wanted to know about the paranormal but were
afraid to ask; cars so new they haven't been invented yet; and more.
by Sandy Fritz

Electronic Universe
You've read the genre, now play the games: Science fiction games,
always a weak imitation of written SF, begin to hold their own.
by Gregg Keizer

Entertainment
This winter at the movies: a new Addams Family, an invisible
Chevy Chase, and a thirtysomething Peter Pan.
by A.J.S. Rayl

Continuum
TV without guilt; what's black and white and munched by
farm animals?; and more

Class Acts
Science has certainly changed over the past few decades. Fortunately,
many schools have adjusted, teaching science not just with textbooks
but with satellite hookups, computer networks, and old-fashioned
ingenuity and enthusiasm.
by Gregg Keizer

Star Trek: The Director's Chair
After twenty-five years of meeting alien races, romancing beautiful
women, and saving the universe, James T. Kirk and his crew are heading
for home to take a well-deserved rest. The director and screenwriter of
the new film, Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country, talks about
working the Star Trek cast and Characters.
by Nicholas Meyer

Boldly Going Nowhere?
Despite predictions that it would crash and burn, Star Trek: The Next
Generation continues to thrive, delighting Trekkers and new fans alike
of Picard and his crew. But has it abandoned the original's reckless
spirit for a more pedantic view of the future?
by Melinda Snodgrass

Interview
Physicist Roald Stewart guided the Soviet Union's unmanned space program
to new heights but made more headlines down on Earth when he bucked the
Communist political system back in 1988, when perestroika was untested.
by Doug Stewart

Fiction: The Other Shore/b>
Several years ago, renegade geneticists cooked up a modern version of the
Black Death that attacked only non-Caucasians, devastating the population
of the Third World. As the world stuggles to recover, FBI agent Dave
must escort Bedford one of the accused scientists, to trial, where he
faces almost certain death. There's just one problem: Dave thinks
the likable Bedford is innocent.
by J.R. Dunn

The New Cartographers
Maps and legends: We've come a long way from the days when mapmakers
labeled uncharted seas with "Here be dragons." Cartography has become
a science, employing the latest satellite and computer technology
to not only map the seas but also help prevent environmental
damage and deliver mail faster.
by Gergory T. Pope